5 Poets for People Who Don’t Like Poetry

Soul, WhitmanYou say you don’t like poetry but, don’t read poems. Consider this list a tasting.

I can appreciate the struggle to enjoy poetry. So many old tomes are long, with forced rhythms and rhymes. And then, current spoken word pieces can be overwhelming to decrypt.

But, I love poetry.

In fact, I prefer to sit and read a single poem from a selection of poems on a Sunday afternoon. Often, it’s aloud and a point of discussion.

Each of these poets are readable, enjoyable and overall, a pleasure to experience.

1.Edward Lear

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This is the limerick guy. He’s snotty and it’s delightful. Also, he drew creepy cartoons to go along with his poems.

Look for an illustrated volume for the complete experience.

Excerpt:

There was an Old Man in a tree,
Who was horribly bored by a Bee;
When they said, ‘Does it buzz?’
He replied, ‘Yes, it does!’
‘It’s a regular brute of a Bee!’

2. Maya Angelou

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Possibly the best known to modern readers, Angelou had a wonderful presence. Her work is quite popular, and become very pinnable, because her words are succinct.

Her thoughts are communal without becoming commonplace.

Excerpt:

I will remember silent walks in
Southern woods and long talks
In low voices
Shielding meaning from the big ears
Of overcurious adults.

3. Pablo Neruda

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Although his quotes about love have become the most popular, Neruda pontificated on a variety of topics. He has a subtle humor that most readers will appreciate.

It breaks up the earnestness of his writing.

Excerpt:

Fleas interest me so much
that I let them bite me for hours.
They are perfect, ancient, Sanskrit,
machines that admit of no appeal.

4. Sylvia Plath

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Although she is better known for her fictional near-memoir, The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath’s poetry continues to resonate.

They’re mostly confessions.

Yet, they’ve become a rallying cry for many.

Excerpt:

The nights snapped out of sight like a lizard’s eyelid :
A world of bald white days in a shadeless socket.

5. C.S. Lewis

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Before he wrote popular children’s fiction or theology musings, Lewis put together youthful, angry words. He had recently returned from the war.

And he had a lot to say about it.

Excerpt:

What call have I to dream of anything?
I am a wolf. Back to the world again,
And speech of fellow-brutes that once were men
Our throats can bark for slaughter: cannot sing.

Tell Me Your Thoughts

Reading poetry is a pleasant way to absorb new thoughts and discover fresh voices. If you liked this list then, you might enjoy reading some new works like 15 Poets You Need to Be Reading in 2018.

Check out some rhymes and tell me what you think.

 

 

 

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