Wishing Upon a Shore

Beach feather in the sand

As a child, I spent my summers at the family beach rental — getting up early to watch the sunrise and falling asleep at night on a couch in the screened porch. Everything was a little damp and too warm — perfection. At that beach house, I made a lifetime supply of bad watercolor art. I sketched and read back issues of national geographic. I talked to strangers. I acted precocious and peculiar. If there is a place where my soul was formed, it was sitting on the end of a bulkhead, endlessly trying to capture the toxic waves of the Jersey shore in green and gold glory.

Atlantic City Feeling

“I’m going to be a diving girl!” proclaimed Sonora at the outset of Wild Hearts Can’t Be Broken. Released in 1991, this film rolls along with the nineties nostalgia by reminding us of our romanticized Great Depression fixation as we head into our own roaring twenty-twenties. As much as I am prone to mock the melodrama, I still replay the “jumping on the horse” scene each time I need motivation. Because I can often relate to the metaphorical, “Look ma, there’s a girl climbing the tower.”

 

The ambition, the angst, and windblown bob continue to capture my imagination. Currently, the shift dress silhouettes and boardwalk beachwood inspire my  aesthetic.

A Seaside Place

At the aforementioned getaway, I would often paint at an aluminum table on the porch — which I begged my family to keep in storage. The ornate legs were difficult to sand and refinish, which I kept in their original glossy white. The green top always capture’s people’s imaginations. For some, it reminds them of a similar piece in their own home. Others have never seen a similar vintage piece. This table fits with my overall home vibe: a simple, seaside place.

 

The beachy inspiration may be hard to detect if you assume themed seashell and beach umbrella style. My look does not hearken a tourist motel room scream toward theme. It’s a feeling inspired by the rush of grass on the dunes and the quiet, bleached tones of a wabi-sabi vacation home.

I’ve always yearned for a simple space, with useful, trusted, practical belongings, that provides a sanctuary for my art. With each apartment, this table sets the style – simple, useful, and trusted.

Vintage Dress- The Conscious Mercantile, Espadrilles – Target, Sunglasses – Franchesca’s

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Wardrobe Remix: Danielle

Visiting the Columnia Museum of Art

Note: Wardrobe Remix is a series of posts inspired by creative ways to get more out of your wardrobe during a seasonal change. To view similar posts, check the “Wardrobe Remix” tag.

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If you regularly follow my posts, then you know that I advocate mindful consumption. Whether that means shopping local, building a capsule wardrobe or reusing bits and bobbles, individuals should buy considerately. This Wardrobe Remix series brings those notions to life for different seasons. I like to see how people, real people that I know, get the most out of the clothing in their closets.

The original concept stemmed from my refusal to do “shopping hauls.” Buying  many pieces at the same time doesn’t create savings in the long run. Instead, those dolla-dolla bills are hanging in your closet. Last fall, during the Wardrobe Remix series, I talked about making room for change by cleaning out my closet. This emotional process moved my outfits to a supporting role for my life. This summer, I’m pushing the boundaries of each remaining clothing item even further — by challenging myself to wear my things to new places.

At The Past Minute

Since my husband has been out of town all summer for training, I’ve maintained regular dates with myself. Yes, that breakup plot-line in every girl-comedy — I am doing that. I started occasionally going out on dates with myself because my husband and I work opposite shifts. During some seasons of life, I have friends to take along to the things I enjoy. Other times, art, books, music, and hiking don’t interest my social circle.

The hardest thing about taking yourself out on a date is the lack pressure to meet a timeline. Fridays in particular are my weakness. I can easily slump home after work and spend the entire evening sitting on the couch. It’s not a peaceful, Pinterest post with a cardigan, novel and cup of tea. It’s an unsettled slouch, where I replay the victories and losses of the work week over and over in my head. Breaking away from Friday work to a Friday night out provides the appropriate mental transition. So, Friday is for chambray. I can layer the trans-formal fabric with linen pants or a skirt to look great for a meeting and chill for an evening at a gallery.

Friday is for Chambray- Danielle, Verderamade

The basic look pairs easily with my eclectic collection of found, made, vintage, and borrowed jewelry. So, I’m going places, by myself. No excuses — no going home to change.

A Blonde Date

I’m a natural bronde – that dark and dirty blonde that always leaves Carrie Bradshaw roots. When I was 21, I dyed my hair a dark chocolate brown because I kind of hated my work and wanted to see something else in the mirror each morning. Then, I started a decades-long dyeing addiction. Much to the enjoyment of my hairdresser, I’m up for any color, and any cut, anytime. This time, she took me back to my roots and that make-under was somehow scarier than a transformative tone.

“I’m so tired of being me. Me beautiful. Me ugly. Blonde. Brunette. A million f*cking fashion makeovers that only leave me trapped being me. Who I was before the accident is just a story now. Everything before now, before now, before now, is just a story I carry around. I guess that would apply to anybody in the world. What I need is a new story about who I am. What I need to do is f*ck up so bad I can’t save myself.” ― Chuck Palahniuk, Invisible Monsters

To see my true colors again remains a wonder. After years of getting high off the novelty of switching tones, I thought this shade would underwhelm me. Instead, it’s bringing back #allthefeels. When I first ran away from being blonde, I relished the fact that people (read: men) took me more seriously. Part of me was always afraid to go back to that ingénue persona.

 

Surprisingly, I actually see how far I’ve come when I look in the mirror now. My younger self might find herself both shocked and pleased at how I’ve spent the last decade. That ghost of hair-color past and I agree, it’s not the hair that makes the woman.

On the Road Again

With a summer separated from my love, I was eager to make a weekend trip to visit him. As I packed, I thought about how everything in my wardrobe goes with everything now. So, packing means putting together an appropriate number of pieces for the duration of days — no mixing, matching or thinking required.

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And I went places. I drove through several states, blaring oldies radio to keep me awake. My linen pants and chambray shirt helped me slide from a desk to a steering wheel. During my visit, the chambray sundress and blue button-down (above) carried me from an early church service, to an art gallery, to eating an Italian hoagie in a hotel room bed.

This summer, my style is about where I’m going — believe me, I’m going.

If you’re interested in guest blogging for a future remix series, please contact me directly.

Wardrobe Remix: Joy

Oxfords shoes

Note: Wardrobe Remix is a series of posts inspired by creative ways to get more out of your wardrobe during a seasonal change. To view similar posts, check the “Wardrobe Remix” tag.

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Creative work at a nuclear facility. A professional manner in an industrial atmosphere. A feminine flavor while safety codes are always the priority. Calm classy responses to crude, reactive conflicts.

These are some of the oxymorons that I encounter as head of communication for a nuclear power facility.

My outfits matter. They make me approachable to the 600 people whom I interact, while subtly insisting that I’m not afraid of standing my ground.

These Oxfords are the classic, foundational piece to my work wardrobe. They meet the industry safety requirements while adding a classic touch to any outfit combo. Oxfords dress up casual slacks or dark jeans and add a sturdy element to dresses. They can blend in or make a statement, and match leather clutches, watches, or jackets. I wear them with black, brown, beige, and gray.

During colder weather, I wear them with dark, patterned wool socks, pleated slacks, and neutral sweaters.

As the weather warms, I change out the knee socks for no-shows and sweaters for similar colors of short sleeve shirts to tuck into high wasted, relaxed fitting pants.

In a career where I often walk a line between extremes, these oxfords can go almost anywhere.

To read more by Joy, click here.

Wardrobe Remix: Danielle D.

Girl with red scarf

Note: Wardrobe Remix is a series of posts inspired by creative ways to get more out of your wardrobe during a seasonal change. To view similar posts, check the “Wardrobe Remix” tag.

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For the first time in two years, I am at a job again where I can wear my own clothes! I won’t lie and say that hearing this in my initial interview didn’t make me want the job even more. Sure, it’s still retail, but at least I’m not in a crazy costume anymore (Oh, the Disney life).

Here is the catch: the only colors we are allowed to wear are black, white, navy, grey, and tan, with no patterns. ALL THE NEUTRALS. If you were to step into my wardrobe, you would find random pieces of clothing in those colors, but also find that they are hidden behind my pale pinks, patterned shirts, and an unnecessary amount of graphic tees.

However, after a few days on the job and observing what my co-workers were accessorizing their bland work clothes with, the outfits themselves turned out to not be so bland after all! With a touch of jewelry and a cute, yet comfortable, shoe, adapting to the neutral tone lifestyle has been a breeze! So, here are my three tips to turn a bland outfit into a fab outfit.

Tip #1: Let a necklace make the statement when the dress can’t

Statement necklaces have become my greatest ally with this new job. My only exception is that the necklace (or scarf) has to come from the store I work in. But, for the rest of you, don’t be afraid to add a bold necklace to your look! Whether it’s a longer chain necklace, a cute choker, or one with lots of jewels, wearing a necklace adds more personality to what once was a simple black dress! Here, I am wearing two different necklaces I can wear to work.

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Tip #2: Play up your makeup, but keep it professional

My last two jobs led me to believe that it was almost a waste to wear a full face of makeup to work. I was either sweating at an outdoor kiosk or working away in the shipping department. Now that I am in a store that encourages us to look more presentable, so I’ve found playing with my makeup look each day keeps my whole outfit more exciting! Sometimes I will choose to add a wing to my eyeliner or add a soft eyeshadow to my everyday makeup routine. Here’s the main thing to remember: you are still going to work, so keep the look professional. Save the bright colored shadows for a day off, and opt for a more natural look.

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Tip #3: Experiment with shoes

This tip has been a more recent experiment for me, but I am loving it! Changing up your shoes each day keeps things interesting, and also makes your feet happy. I personally like to switch out between sandals and flats, but I have seen others add in wedges to their shoe collection. Like the necklace can make a statement at the top of your outfit, your neck can take a day off and let your shoes do the talking.

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So the next time you put on your work attire and feel bland, try these three tips and you’ll leave home feeling and looking fabulous!

Danielle Ashley is a Broadway news editor, avid tweeter, and fan of all things Disney. Follow her on Twitter, Instagram, and check out her blog Danielle Ashley.

All Belle Breaks Loose

“Feminism is all about giving women choice. Feminism is not a stick with which to beat other women with. It’s about freedom. It’s about liberation. It’s about equality. And I really don’t know what my tits have to do with it,” responded Emma Watson in an interview about her Vanity Fair cover.

In a not-surprising but, still-disappointing reaction, the internet pinned an H for hypocrite on Watson during her promotion of the live action Beauty and the Beast remake when she posed in a revealing, high-fashion top. Her feminist path, and the re-inventive path of the film, presented a juxtaposition that feminists, literati, film critics, and conservatives all struggled to compartmentalize from social context. This post explores the dynamics and discussion that have followed this fairytale remake.

Disney Princesses in 2017

To see if Disney Princesses can work in our world, I gave them all modern careers. Details on each at the bottom of the post.

Watson’s Awakening

Watson has bloomed into an enigma, defying stereotypes in the best way, yet struggling to garner widespread approval. First, she shot to stardom with her screen-stealing portrayal of the precocious Hermione. Then, she quietly pursued a college degree with nary a scandal. From there, Watson has gracefully stepped into a role as feminist spokesperson, beginning with her presentation to the United Nations several years ago.

Yet, Watson seems plagued by an inability to present with the typical starlet catastrophes. Instead, she focused on creative projects with nary a crash or burnout in sight. This un-called-for diligence and humanity, probably resulting from decent parenting, makes her a troll-able target. Thus, the Beauty and the Beast film, and subsequently Watson, became subject to critique.

To some, she presents a conundrum. She’s progressive and liberal. Yet, partnered with Disney project that hearkens back to anti-progressive tropes that this remake has tried to reinterpret for a modern audience. Throughout promotion, critics have questions what Watson is doing in the film. Watson herself has reviewed the role of the fairytales in our modern culture. The public, in general, seemed generally underwhelmed by both the film and its surrounding controversy. In fact, some bloggers seemed perplexed at the homophobic hype. So, I found myself asking, “Why did all Belle break loose?”

Original Synopsis

Although each incarnation of this “tale as old as time” attempts to ground the narrative within the current cultural climate, Belle’s journey is problematic for modern viewers. In the original story, a widower merchant raises his six children in a life of luxury. The most beloved daughter, Belle is both the most kind and the most beautiful. These recurring traits present in most European princess stories and typically dominate both the themes and story arcs.

Later, unfortunate circumstances send the merchant home from a business trip with no money, and the family’s lifestyle lessens with time. However, when the merchant finds that his fortune may be recovered, all of his children, except Belle, make lavish requests. Belle requests a single, perfect rose. This request is symbolic for her own purity and beauty.

However, the merchant’s journey is fruitless. He returns home during a storm, seeking shelter in a palace. The home of the titular Beast, the merchant finds inside both coldness and wealth. Disguised, the beast offers, shelter, comfort, and gifts. However, the merchant oversteps and steals the most perfect rose he can find in the Beast’s garden.

This results in a confrontation, wherein, the merchant opts to trade one of his daughters as a wife for the beast in return for the mistake.

When the merchant relays his plight to his children, Belle volunteers to pay her father’s debt and moves into captivity with the beast. From there, the story follows the general relationship arc seen in the modern versions. The Beast starts with aggressive, crass tactics to win over Belle. Then, they eventually form a bond that leads to a deeper relationship.

The original synopsis contains several elements common to princess stories that have questionably returned in the Disney retellings. First, beauty, kindness, submissiveness, and youth are all paramount traits in a fairytale woman. In fact, I have only read one fairytale (The Twelve Dancing Princesses) where the leading man has intentionally chosen the eldest as his mate. Second, daughters are used as tools to barter debts, restore a family’s name, or raise in social class. This is why the stories must often start with a tragic backstory to create the initial conflict. Third, princesses function as ambassadors of comfort, wonder, and beauty. In difficult situations, they make homes, attract magic or magical creatures, grow gardens, and raise attractive offspring. Therefore, the stories often end with a “happily ever after,” signaling that turbulence has been transformed to peace through love, marriage, and homemaking.

The Problem with Princesses

“Everything’s a story – You are a story – I am a story.”

― Frances Hodgson Burnett, A Little Princess

Capitalizing on our nostalgia, Disney (and other clever studios) are going to continue making fairytale films, live-action or otherwise. And critics will continue to voice skepticism. Yes, the stories have stood the test of time because they communicate universal truths about the human condition. Yes, the plots and many of the themes are oddly rooted in the conventions of the feudal system. No, we don’t need to crap on everything you loved from your childhood. No, we don’t need to just accept something because of tradition.

You see, the problem with fairytales is a problem with princesses as an archetype without modern analog. Currently, our political princesses have not lived fairytale lives. Some are generationally royal, and a few are social-climbers. They fill a political role and function like businesswomen and politicians. The required traits of a modern princess don’t align with the beauty, virginity, and submissiveness valued in the old tales.

Additionally, those traits also don’t lead to success, or even necessarily contentment, in the modern world. Yet, the stories we tell children, and the stories we cling to as young people, shape our view of the world, ourselves, and the future. Wishing for a fairytale ending? Now, that’s wishing for disaster.

The Stories We Need

As a child, I absorbed both the Disney tales and the historical versions. I relished the fantasy and found myself identifying with aspects of the characters. I wanted to be like them, beautiful, kind, loveable, and valued. I wanted to achieve a place in the world, like those heroines build by the end of each book.

But as I matured, those were not the stories I needed. By kindergarten, I needed to identify with the (petite) Luke Skywalker’s battle against the odds. In middle school, I appreciated the pluck of Amelia Earhart, even with her controversial (excluded from history books) relationships. In high school, I journeyed with Samwise Gamgee as he exhibited the courage of servant leadership. In college, I listened as Marya Hornbacher of Wasted told me I was allowed to take up space in the world. I watched as Betty Suarez of Ugly Betty, Camile Saroyan of Bones, and Echo of Dollhouse navigated male-dominated social structures. Each day, I found myself referencing Moses’ path to leadership or Gladys Aylward’s lifetime of sacrifice.

Later, when I found myself choosing a partner for life, I didn’t reference a Disney story. I considered the toxicity of Riley, Angel, Xander, and Spike in Buffy the Vampire Slayer. I weighed the dynamic of Clementine and Joel in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. I listened to Regina Spektor as she sang Us. I considered Sylvia Plath as she asserted, “I took a deep breath and listened to the old brag of my heart: I am, I am, I am.”

Defining my place in the world, so infrequently references the lessons from the Grim brother or Hans Christian Anderson. Instead, I need stories whose value, as humans, is not based in their loveliness or purity, but the actions they take to make the world a better place. As a Christian, I believe this means furthering the Gospel. In our society, I think we can benefit from a mutual care and respect for our fellow humans, even when they are imperfect or damaged.

All Girls are Princesses

I stand by Sarah in A Little Princess as she explains, “I am a princess. All girls are. Even if they live in tiny old attics. Even if they dress in rags, even if they aren’t pretty, or smart, or young. They’re still princesses.” In Sarah’s story, she begins boarding schools as the indulged child of a British officer. With time, she earns a reputation for being dreamy and charming. Later, her fortunes change as her father is reported dead, flipping her from the wealthiest student with the best room to the maid of the school living in the attic.

After the tragedy, the headmistress acts particularly cruel toward Sarah, from lingering jealousy and resentment. Even still, Sarah acts with dignity and treats others with respect. Although, at first, one would assume her princess persona was tied to her wealthy, the reader discovers her wonder and dignity are internalized values that she manifests through her actions in all circumstances. She explains, “Whatever comes cannot alter one thing. If I am a princess in rags and tatters, I can be a princess inside. It would be easy to be a princess if I were dressed in cloth of gold, but it is a great deal more of a triumph to be one all the time when no one knows it.”

Which leads to the conclusion: If all of us are princesses, then actually, none of us are princesses. We all have equal value and it is our daily actions, not our titles, mates, or appearances, that define us. This understanding allows us to fit fairytales back into their natural place. At their best, fairytales explore admirable character traits such as humility, courage, or optimism. However, at times, their original settings warp deeper messages.

My Princess Project

As I considered whether the classic princesses can be the stories that we need, I reimagined them for the year 2017. With their traits and backgrounds, what would each of these young women do in our world? Below are my suggestions.

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Snow White, Health and Safety Inspector

During her time living with the little people, Snow White’s eyes were opened to the necessity of oversight and regulation in the energy industry. This led her to a career in health and safety inspecting, to ensure the well-being of workers.

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Jasmine, Travel Journalist

Once she left the Sultan’s palace, Jasmine caught the travel bug. Immersing herself in the stories of the people that populate small towns, she finds herself documenting the world, one article at a time.

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Ariel, eCommerce Photographer

As an avid junk collector, Ariel took her hobby to the next level by joining forces with a global eCommerce antiquing platform. Her propensity for exploring the provenance of items has led her to become the chief photographer for the website.

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Tiana, Headhunter for Business Incubator

After trials in trying to start a restaurant, Tiana connected with a progressive business incubator. She travels the country, meeting with aspiring entrepreneurs to prepare them for their business pitches.

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Cinderella, Adoption Coordinator

Her disrupted life as an orphan, and deep connection with animals, led Cinderella to join forces with the local humane society. As the adoption coordinator, she reviews applications and homes animals to ensure appropriate placement.

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Mulan, Campaign Manager

After retiring from her successful military career, Mulan became engaged several female political candiates that advocate for women’s rights. Her experiences help shape their campaign messages to support working women, as a necessary cornerstone of modern society.

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Belle, Social Worker

Her dysfunctional relationship with her family of origin exposed Belle to the need for safe havens and intervention. As a social worker, specializing in cases of human trafficking, Belle supports and advocates for the rights of her clients.

 

What do you think of my princess project? Sound off in the comments.

 

 

 

Festival Season After College

Woman painting

The closer I move to chanting “I’m thirty, flirty, and thriving” the more I question how festival style works after college. My first, cynical reaction brought me back to my retail days where shop girls quietly judged adult women who shopped in the “juniors” section – no matter whether the sizes fit. My inner critic started censoring items saying, “You’re too old for that.”

Music is the universal language of mankind. – Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

However, I considered the needs of my actual stage of life. Sure, I don’t spend my nights sleeping in vans anymore but, I still do go to outdoor festivals and concerts. Now, I actually afford whimsical vintage items that will last in my closet for more than one summer season. Now, I can actually take the time to soak in shows and festivals.

So, I am rolling back that grumpy-cat attitude and embracing the truth of this stage of life. If twenty was fun… thirty will be awesome.

Wrist bands on, fest vibes strong. The countdown is on! The official start of festival season is less than one week away and kicks off summer in the Cali desert. For the next two weekends, nothing matters but the music (and the fashion, of course). To get you desert festival-ready, we’re showing you looks that…

via AEO FESTIVAL FASHION: What To Wear This Fest Season — American Eagle Outfitters Blog

Spring 2017 Style

Take any year, search for spring trends and you’ll find a litany of remixed patterns, colors and shapes to inspire ready-to-wear (khaki, khaki, khaki) for the next year. I’m constantly inspired by both high fashion and street style. However, my own spring style revamp is less in the buying and more in the vision-casting. With every season, I build on the process and use it as an opportunity to build my own aesthetic.

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Sketch for a project

Clear Out and Clean Up

A new year, and colder weather, is an apt time to dig through the dusty parts of the closet. As I think about my goals for the next year, I consider my clothing priorities. Depending on what projects I’m tackling, my wardrobe carries a different role. Sometimes, I’m focused on climbing professionally and need to bolster my traditional office-wear to boost my confidence. Other times, I am expanding my artistic side and find it inspiring to simply my style to focus on making. Still other times, I’m feeling gloomy and nostalgic or cheery pieces life my mood.

Absorb and Expand

To create anything, one must breathe in inspiration. The same is true with building out a new look for the season. Personally, my fashion inspiration rarely comes from the runway or the trends around me. Instead, it crosses over from literature, film, and art. I see, watch or read something new. Then, I latch onto the colors, textures, or feelings that match those moods.

“Fashion is what you’re offered four times a year by designers. And style is what you choose.” —Lauren Hutton

Augment not Makeover

The core of my wardrobe is pretty plain. I stick to one silhouette, flowing tops with fitted shoulders and skinny bottoms (pencil skirts and straight jeans). The change up comes with the shoes, necklaces, bags and hair. Those little touches shake up my look from season to season. Since I like change, a smaller wardrobe actually gives me more versatility. For example, I always keep less than 10 pairs of shoes. So, they wear out much faster. This allows me to keep them current, replacing each pair after eight months or so.

Match and Mix

Finally, I lay out all the pieces and make sure each item works with an outfit. This shows the holes in my wardrobe and ensures nothing drops to the back of the closet. Also, it helps weed out the pieces I don’t love. While it may seem a bit frivilous to put so much care into reworking my wardrobe for the spring seasons, it has become a thoughtful process of preparation. And for the final trick, the castoffs fall into a DIY pile – probably my favorite part. Check out P.S. I Made This and Mark Montano to get some attainable ideas to augment your wardrobe.

For now, I’m collecting some inspiration for Spring and Summer 2017 below. Sound off on your favorite looks on my facebook page.

Wardrobe Remix: April

Makeup Tips Verderamade

Note: Wardrobe Remix is a series of posts inspired by creative ways to get more out of your wardrobe during a seasonal change. To view similar posts, check the “Wardrobe Remix” tag.

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Hello there! I became friends with Dani in college and she asked me to write a guest blog for the Wardrobe Remix. You’ll probably get lots of fashion inspiration from this series… so you’ll need some makeup ideas to complete your look! Special thanks to my sister and my future SILs for being my other models.

*Note, I have no professional makeup training. I just love makeup!

For each look I will list the materials that I used. If you have similar products, feel free to experiment! These are just some ideas to get you started. My focus is on eye makeup, so I will not get into foundation or highlighting and contouring. That’s a whole different ball game….

Geek Chic Makeup for Gals with Glasses

Remember the days when we were kids and wearing glasses was a bad thing? As a glasses-wearer, I’m glad that specs are back in style. However, glasses cast a shadow on your face and draw attention to your eyes, so there are special considerations to make your eyes pop.

Start with a clean face, following your typical skincare regimen. (This should include wearing a moisturizer and sunscreen!)

  • NYC white eye liner
  • Sephora Wedding Day (white) eyeshadow
  • Urban Decay Alice Through The Looking Glass Palette (Lily, Metamorphosis, Time/Bandersnatch,)
  • Urban Decay Moondust palette (Granite, Vega)
  • Jordana eyeliner (black and blue)
  • Dior Blackout mascara
  • Diorshow It-blue mascara
  • Dior Brow Styler

Since I wanted to focus more on the eye makeup I didn’t get fancy with the face or lip stuff.

  1. With glasses, you want to brighten your eyes as much as possible since the frames draw attention to this part of your face. To do this, I colored my eyelids with white eyeliner and added just a touch of highlighter under my eyes. Another thing that helps draw attention to the eyes: curling your lashes!! PS- if you have darker skin, coloring your eyelids with a white colored pencil will especially help your eyes pop!
  2. Next, I applied a bit of white eye shadow (Sephora’s Wedding Day) to my entire lid, focusing on the inner corners. To the outer half to 2/3 of the lids I applied Metamorphisis from the Alice palette and highlighted under the brows with Lily. I used the brush that comes in this palette (the end with the shorter bristles).
  3. As usual when I’m doing my eye makeup, I did some experimenting for the crease and outer corners. I typical will do subtle shading in the crease, but with glasses it looks better if there is more of a defined crease. I started with the Urban Decay Moondust palette and blended Granite and Vega; this mixture was applied to the crease and the outer corner. To add a bit more dimension I blended Time and Bandersnatch in the outer corners. To finish you should always blend blend blend!! I typically will just clean my brush off with tissue, then use the brush to blend.
  4. With glasses it’s sooo important to define the eyebrows. I love Dior’s browstyler because it blends to match your haircolor… like magic! There are some products I will splurge on and others where I’ll search for bargains. To me, this is worth the splurge! Then I used Jordana eyeliner (black on top, blue on the bottom). Jordana and Milani eyeliners are great because they’re inexpensive but they don’t smudge. I’m a bit of a cheapskate when it comes to eyeliner. Then for mascara I went with Dior again. I love love LOVE their Blackout mascara. Seriously. I could not love a human baby as much as I love Dior’s Blackout mascara. It’s the blackest black mascara I have ever seen!! Since I love color so much, I like to apply colored liner and mascara on the bottom lash line with black on top.
  5. I may or may not have chosen blue to match my R2-D2 dress…. Maybe.

Natural Autumn Look

I convinced two of my boyfriend’s sisters to help model makeup looks. Nataliya likes a more natural look (as do many women), so I wanted to do a natural look with autumnal colors. I blended various colors throughout this look, but if you want to keep it simple you could just pick one color per step!

  • Sleek Makeup Oh-so-special palette
  • W7 Color Me Buff (UD Naked 2 dupe)
  • Jordana black eyeliner
  • Anastasia Brow Wiz
  • Tarte Tarteist Lash Paint Mascara

Again, you’ll want to start with a clean face after your regular skincare regimen.

  1. For the eyelids I blended two colors: Ribbon from the Oh So Special palette with Dust from the In the Buff palette. This palette looks almost exactly like Naked 2… at a fraction of the price! If you love Urban Decay and want to buy the actual makeup palette, go for it! But….I’m a therapist and I’m poor, so I try to save money when possible. I highlighted under the brows by blending two colors from In the Buff: Buff, and Sand.
  2. For the crease colors, I used Thunder, Onyx, and Silk. I used Thunder in the main part of the crease. To add dimension I added a hint of Onyx to the outer corners and Silk to the inner corners. And as always… blend!!
  3. Nataliya did her eyebrows, eyeliner, and mascara with the materials listed above. For the final look…..
  4. She’s so pretty even without makeup, but this look adds an extra touch to make her look stunning!

Formal Winter Smoky Eyes

Galia (Nataliya’s sister) loves makeup almost as much as I do, so I knew she’d be open to a bold, smoky look.

  • W7 In The Buff Lightly Toasted Eye Color Palette
  • Tarte Tarteist Lash Paint Mascara
  • Eye-ko liquid eyeliner
  • Ulta Beauty Gems Eye Palette
  • UD Woodstock
  • Ulta Glitter topcoat
  • Sephora white glitter eye shadow

Plus she loves Christmas, so I figured Christmas + bold makeup = lots of fun!

  1. Under the brow, I highlighted with Teddy from the W7 Lightly Toasted palette. On the lids, I used white glitter shadow in the inner third of the lid. For the outer two thirds I blended  Magic and It’s a Dream.
  2. For the crease I choose a berry color from the Beauty Gems palette (which I discovered has been discontinued. Sad day!!). Because holly berry…. Christmas… duh. I liked the berry color and wanted to add a bit more color, so in the inner lid I blended a bit of Urban Decay’s Woodstock (dark pink) shadow. To add some dimension and a bit of smokiness, I blended Up in Smoke from the W7 palette with the berry color used before.
  3. Galia loves the winged liner look, so I asked her to do her own eyeliner. For her liner, mascara, and eyebrows she used all the products listed above. To add some more elegance, I dusted over the entire lid with Ulta Glitter Top Coat.
  4. I love how this look turned out! Not everyone can pull off these colors along with glitter but Galia looks gorgeous in this look!

Sugar Skull Inspired Look

Call me weird, but even though I have no Mexican blood in me whatsoever, I have always LOVED sugar skulls. I think because I minored in Spanish and I also love science and anatomy, along with bright, bold colors! Sugar skulls combine so many of my loves!! (Plus they’re candy. Duh.)

  • Myo  Makeup Envy (purple) loose powder eyeshadow
  • Sephora eye primer
  • Sephora Rolling in the Grass No. 10 eye shadow
  • UD Moondust Lightyear and Galaxy eye shadows
  • Jordana black and purple eyeliners
  • Dior Blackout mascara
  • Diorshow It-purple mascara
  • Urban Decay Alice Through The Looking Glass (Lily)

I love sugar skulls, but painting my entire face like a sugar skull is not exactly practical. Plus I’m pretty sure I’d get weird looks any day except Halloween. So for this look I wanted to incorporate one of my favorite aspects of the sugar skull: bright, bold colors!! And who would I rather do this look on than my big sister? Heather taught me how to do my makeup in my young, pre-pubescent years, so it was fun to do her make up for a change!

  1. Heather remembered to get a picture of the lash curling that I failed to capture earlier…
  2. I got so into this look that I totally forgot to take as many pictures of the steps as I should. Oopsie poopsie!! The bright purple shadow (Envy) I used is a loose powder that will only stick to the lid when applied with primer. I used a basic eye primer from Sephora. If you love bright colors, you’ll love Myo Make up. I found this color along with several others on Amazon. I couldn’t find the actual color I used, but this kit includes a similar purple. I highlighted under the brows with Lily, then applied Sephora Rolling in the Grass No. 10 eye shadow in the crease. At this point I finally remembered to take another picture.
  3. I realized that that wasn’t the kind of green I was going for. So I also blended Lightyear and Galaxy into the crease. For eyeliner, Heather used Jordana black on top and purple on the bottom. She uses ELF eyebrow gel (which she had already applied prior to the session). Then we used Dior mascara again; Blackout on top with purple on the bottom.
  4. And here’s the final look! Thanks to my lovely sister for letting me do this spunky makeup look on her!

Hopefully you found some inspiration to have fun with your makeup and play with color. There are lots of options whether you’re looking to save or splurge. You can find any of the products listed above (or similar ones) from Ulta, Sephora, or Amazon.

Happy Fall!! -April

Wardrobe Remix: Sarah

Wardrobe Remix Sarah

Note: Wardrobe Remix is a series of posts inspired by creative ways to get more out of your wardrobe during a seasonal change. To view similar posts, check the “Wardrobe Remix” tag.

remixs

Hello new friends! I’m excited to be taking over Verderamade’s blog (don’t worry, I’ll only be here temporarily)!

A little about me: My name is Sarah, I am a recent college graduate with a degree in Fashion. I’m also a fellow blogger still developing my brand and I’d love for you to join me on my journey (check out wordsandredlipstick on WordPress, Facebook and Instagram). I’m a “Fashion Friday’s” kind of gal, and today I want to inspire you to style some of your summer pieces in new ways for cooler temps.

 

We all know the 90s grunge and vintage styles are back (unless you didn’t, and in that case I’m glad I could enlighten you today).  My modern take on a classic style with the tank top over the tee is perfect for fall. I paired the tops with vintage 100% cotton denim (yeah no stretch what so ever) and metallic loafers. Go ahead and copy the look when there is a chill in the air – or just use it as inspiration.

Some other options for outfit inspiration are wearing a tank top under a layering piece such as a sweater, blazer, or even a jacket (denim or leather).  If you want to channel your inner Carrie (Bradshaw of course) go for a dress worn over pants. Another great look is a summer dress over a tee (long sleeve or short, depending on the weather).

Fall is all about layering, so don’t be afraid to take some summer staples and layer in your fall must haves. Remember to always have fun with your outfit and confidence is key.

xx words and red lipstick